Hardware, Software, and Technology Tools in the Business Education Classroom

Authors

  • Elisha Wohleb Auburn University
  • Leane Skinner Auburn University
  • Bonnie White Auburn University

Keywords:

Technology, Business education, barriers, Barriers to Technology

Abstract

Background: Technological advancements in the educational classroom may still result in failure to integrate technology. Purpose: This study provides information that may be utilized to improve the integration of hardware, software, and technology tools in business/marketing education programs. Method: Business/marketing education teachers in a southern state were surveyed to determine the degree of availability, usage, and barriers to integrating hardware, software, and technology tools. Results: Significant differences were found in the use of hardware and technology tools based on the years of teaching experience. The majority of respondents reported integration barriers as extrinsic with leading barriers being budget constraints and information technology limitations. Conclusions: Business/marketing educators integrate technology into the classroom in varying degrees and perceive that barriers to integrating hardware, software, and technology tools exist. Teaching experience is a critical indicator of the integration of technology tools into the business/marketing classroom.

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Published

2013-12-01

How to Cite

Wohleb, E., Skinner, L., & White, B. (2013). Hardware, Software, and Technology Tools in the Business Education Classroom. Journal of Research In Business Education, 55(2), 19-35. https://jrbe.nbea.org/index.php/jrbe/article/view/72

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